How to Train Your Dog: Tips, Tricks & Best Course Module to Train Your Furry Friend (Dog)

If you’re thinking about getting a dog or already have one, consider teaching it some basic commands. Obedience training not only helps to raise a happy and loyal companion but, more importantly, one day it might literally save your dog’s life.

At what age can I start training my new puppy?

You will be training your puppy from the moment you bring it home and start to house train. Puppies start learning from birth and good breeders begin handling and socialization right away. Some training can begin as soon as the puppy can open its eyes and walk. Young puppies have short attention spans but you can expect them to begin to learn simple obedience commands such as “sit,” “down,” and “stay,” as young as 7 to 8 weeks of age.

Formal dog training has traditionally been delayed until 6 months of age. Actually, this juvenile stage is a very poor time to start. The dog is learning from every experience and delaying training means missed opportunities for the dog to learn how you would like him to behave. During the juvenile stage, the dog is beginning to solidify adult behavioral patterns and progresses through fear periods. Behaviors learned in puppyhood may need to be changed. In addition, anything that has already been learned or trained incorrectly will need to be undone and re-taught. Puppies are capable of learning much from an early age.

Top 10 training tips

  1. Choose your dog’s name wisely and be respectful of itOf course you’ll want to pick a name for your new puppy or dog that you love, but for the purposes of training it also helps to consider a short name ending with a strong consonant. This allows you to say his name so that he can always hear it clearly. A strong ending (i.e. Jasper, Jack, Ginger) perks up puppy ears—especially when you place a strong emphasize at the end.

    If he’s an older dog, he’s probably used to his name; however, changing it isn’t out of the question. If he’s from a shelter, they may neglect to tell you that he has a temporary name assigned to him by staff. If he’s from a breeder, he’ll come to you with a long name, which you may want to shorten, or change. And if he’s coming out of an abusive situation, a new name may represent a fresh start. But we’re lucky: dogs are extremely adaptable. And soon enough, if you use it consistently, he will respond to his new name.

    New name or old, as much as possible, associate it with pleasant, fun things, rather than negative. The goal is for him to think of his name the same way he thinks of other great stuff in his life, like “walk,” “cookie,” or “dinner!”
  2. Decide on the “house rules. Before he comes home, decide what he can and can’t do. Is he allowed on the bed or the furniture? Are parts of the house off limits? Will he have his own chair at your dining table? If the rules are settled on early, you can avoid confusion for both of you.
  3. Set up his private den. He needs “a room of his own.” From the earliest possible moment give your pup or dog his own, private sleeping place that’s not used by anyone else in the family, or another pet. He’ll benefit from short periods left alone in the comfort and safety of his den. Reward him if he remains relaxed and quiet. His den, which is often a crate, will also be a valuable tool for housetraining.
  4. Help him relax when he comes home. When your puppy gets home, give him a warm hot water bottle and put a ticking clock near his sleeping area. This imitates the heat and heartbeat of his litter mates and will soothe him in his new environment. This may be even more important for a new dog from a busy, loud shelter who’s had a rough time early on. Whatever you can do to help him get comfortable in his new home will be good for both of you.
  5. Teach him to come when called. Come Jasper! Good boy! Teaching him to come is the command to be mastered first and foremost. And since he’ll be coming to you, your alpha status will be reinforced. Get on his level and tell him to come using his name. When he does, make a big deal using positive reinforcement. Then try it when he’s busy with something interesting. You’ll really see the benefits of perfecting this command early as he gets older.
  6. Reward his good behavior. Reward your puppy or dog’s good behavior with positive reinforcement. Use treats, toys, love, or heaps of praise. Let him know when’s he’s getting it right. Likewise, never reward bad behaviour; it’ll only confuse him.
  7. Take care of the jump up. Puppies love to jump up in greeting. Don’t reprimand him, just ignore his behavior and wait ’til he settles down before giving positive reinforcement. Never encourage jumping behavior by patting or praising your dog when he’s in a “jumping up” position. Turn your back on him and pay him no attention.
  8. Teach him on “dog time. Puppies and dogs live in the moment. Two minutes after they’ve done something, it’s forgotten about. When he’s doing something bad, try your chosen training technique right away so he has a chance to make the association between the behavior and the correction. Consistent repetition will reinforce what’s he’s learned.
  9. Discourage him from biting or nipping. Instead of scolding him, a great way to put off your mouthy canine is to pretend that you’re in great pain when he’s biting or nipping you. He’ll be so surprised he’s likely to stop immediately. If this doesn’t work, try trading a chew toy for your hand or pant leg. The swap trick also works when he’s into your favorite shoes. He’ll prefer a toy or bone anyway. If all else fails, break up the biting behavior, and then just ignore him.
  10. End training sessions on a positive note. Excellent boy! Good job, Jasper! He’s worked hard to please you throughout the training. Leave him with lots of praise, a treat, some petting, or five minutes of play. This guarantees he’ll show up at his next class with his tail wagging—ready to work!
two small beautiful dogs Golden Retriever white puppies playing on the green lawn close up

Having a trained dog isn’t the same as having a balanced dog, but if your dog knows a few basic commands, it can be helpful when tackling problem behaviors — existing ones or those that may develop in the future.

So where do you start with dog obedience training? You could take a class, but it’s not necessary; you can do it yourself. In fact, with the right attitude, it can be fun for both you and your dog!

Sit

This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

Come

This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

Down

This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

Stay

Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

Leave it

This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Establish A Potty Training Routine

When you decide to adopt or buy a puppy, you should keep in mind that his digestive system works very quickly. So every 15-30 minutes after eating, your puppy will feel the need to urinate and defecate. That’s why you have to regularly take him outside.

  • Make sure the dog has a place to relieve himself that seems and smells familiar and where he feels safe.
  • Every morning take him outside at the same time and place. This way he will get used to it quickly. Also take your puppy outside after he wakes from a nap.
  • If you get angry because the puppy urinates and poops everywhere, he feels it, gets stressed, and learns little. Use a friendly voice, and be patient when you train your little companion.
  • Once your puppy has successfully gone outside, it is important to reward the good behavior.
  • Don’t punish your pet if he ever does it outside the permitted area. Quietly remove the puppy to the place where you want him to go.
  • Remember that if you want your puppy to learn a habit, it’s important to establish a routine by taking your puppy outside to the same general area and at the same time.

A Place to Sleep

It’s important that your dog has his own place to sleep, but you need to train him to go to this area at will.

What to do:

  • Provide your dog with a comfortable and warm bed.
  • Add blankets and pillows to make it even more comfortable.
  • Lead him with a treat or his favorite toy to connect a positive reward with his sleeping place. The dog must “feel” that it is he who chooses the sleeping area. If you force him to go there, he will associate this place with something negative.
  • If you want to share your bed with your dog, do not do it right away. Wait until he is well trained. You should never let him jump on your bed uninvited.
  • If you decide to change your dog’s sleeping place, be sure he has plenty of food and exercise — this will help him adjust more easily to a new sleeping area.

If you want your Dog to be a Pro then there’re many courses available online. I would recommend to train your dog using these courses instead of assigning a trainer who can be rude some time with your dog.

Brain Training – Develops your Dog’s “Hidden Intelligence” To eliminate bad behavior and Create the obedient, well-behaved pet of your dreams…

What Makes My Dog Training System So Unique…

Most Dog training programs today fail to engage your Dog on a mental level, and fail to develop his/her intelligence. With enough mental stimulation – many problem behaviors simply melt away. I’ll explain why below.

Most dog training programs fail you and your dog because they never address the root cause of your dog’s problem behavior. They just give you some cookie-cutter technique to stop biting, chewing or barking – which is short term in its effectiveness at best – again, because it does not address the root cause of the problem.

Most dog training programs use OUTDATED force and dominance techniques. This is proven NOT to work by the latest research. My methods are force-free and gentle. They rely on the latest science in dog behavior research to create a strong bond between you and your dog and create positive emotions in your dog as opposed to fearful ones. They only reinforce the behaviors you want.

Many other online dog training programs are created by PHONEYS with no certifications… This is dangerous, since using the wrong techniques will lead to problem behaviors getting worse or even a bite in some cases. Avoid taking advice from any “trainer” who does not list his/her professional certifications.

Who Needs This Secret to using your dog’s natural intelligence to stop bad behavior?

Does any of the following sound familiar…
  • Your dog doesn’t listen to you
  • You need to train a new Puppy
  • Your dog barks uncontrollably
  • Your Dog is pulling on the leash
  • Your Dog is aggressive
  • Your Dog is chewing things he shouldn’t
  • Your Dog is digging all the time
  • Your Dog is Jumping up
  • You’re frustrated with your dog
  • You may even regret getting your Dog
  • You’re worried you might have to give up your Dog because of behavior problems you can’t handle
  • You feel helpless to control your dog
  • You tell your Dog ‘no’ with no success
  • Your Dog gets over excited and is hard to settle down
  • Your Dog is whining constantly
  • Your dog has a fear of certain sounds or stimuli or suffers from anxiety
  • You want a dog who obeys you
  • You want a better bond with your dog
  • You want less stress

Almost ANY behavior problem you can think of can be quickly and easily cured with the simple techniques with this program.

Click Here To Get Your Training Module

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